College in High School
From Washington, D.C. to California, from State College to South Africa... CHS students go far.

Course Outlines

The following is a list of courses available through the College in High School (CHS) program. The course outlines provide detailed breakdowns of the topics each class will cover and the texts and other materials students will need. High school guidance counselors can share what courses are offered at each school.


Academic Success

ARTSC 0111: Right Start to College 1

This one-credit course provides students the opportunity to learn and utilize academic success strategies necessary for college courses. Because of this interaction, students are strongly encouraged to enroll in a college or AP course as a co-requisite to be taken simultaneously with Right Start. In the case where a student’s individual circumstances do not allow the student to enroll in a co-requisite, the student is expected to apply the learning from this course to another advanced level course on their schedule. This course can be taught in one semester. Like all CHS courses, Right Start to College 1 must also earn high school credit.

Number of Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Liaison: Michele Lagnese
Course Outline »

Communication

COMMRC 0500: Argument

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of research and argument construction. Defense of an argument is presented both verbally and in writing. Topics of this course include an introduction to argument, types of argument, constructing an argument, research methods and evidence, delivery of argument, delivery and refutation of arguments, cross-examination, and evaluation or criticism of arguments.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Liaison: Eric English
Course Outline »

Computer Science or Information Science

CS 0004: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC

NO LONGER ACCEPTING NEW TEACHER APPLICATIONS FOR THIS COURSE. This course serves students with a variety of career or academic interests. BASIC was originally created to facilitate the learning of programming. Moreover, its interactive features, power, and versatility have made it the most widely employed programming language for home computers. Topics include problem analysis, development of algorithms, statements, commands, debugging, loops, control structures, expressions and operators, the top-down programming concept, subroutines, arrays and subscripts, nested structures and loops, logical operators, sorting algorithms, string data and character string manipulations, file access, graphics, sound, and color.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One year of high school algebra.
Faculty Liaison: Tan Kosiyatrakul

CS 0007: Introduction to Computer Programming

This is a first course in computer programming. It is recommended for students intending to major in computer science who do not have the required background for Computer Science 0401. It also may be of interest to students majoring in one of the social sciences or humanities. The focus of the course is on program analysis and the development of algorithms and computer programs in a modern high-level language.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Two years of high school mathematics and interest in computer science as a major. Some familiarity with computers in general is assumed.
Faculty Liaison: Nicholas Farnan

CS 0008: Introduction to Computer Programming Python

CS 0008 is designed to teach students with no programming experience how to analyze and solve problems using the Python programming language (version 3.x). The course begins with an overview of the inner-working of modern computers to illustration tot eh students that computers, while quite intricate, are merely machines. With this in mind, the rest of the course will focus on helping the students learn to use these machines as problem solving tools through the use of Python.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: There are no formal prerequisites, but some familiarity with computers in general is assumed of all students.
Faculty Liaison: Nicholas Farnan

CS 0134: Web Site Design and Development

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of the methods and techniques of developing a simple to moderately complex Web site using the standard Web page language XHTML, Dreamweaver or comparable, and JavaScript. Students also will learn Web site design and layout techniques as well as basic search engine analysis.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Liaison: Don Bonidie

CS 0334: Intermediate Web Site Design & Development

The objective of this course is introduce students to more advanced implementations of both markup as well as scripting languages, in addition, students will be introduced to a graphical interface application that will allow them to explore concepts of server side web development. A reflective programming language and database application will be used to introduce the server side web development concepts.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: CS 0134, CS 0007, or CS 0401
Faculty Liaison: Don Bonidie

CS 0401: Intermediate Programming Using Java

The purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamental topics in computer science and improve programming skills with in introduction to programming in Java. This would be a first course for students intending to major in computer science in college.

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Previous programming experience including arrays, records, and functions with parameters.
Faculty Liaison: John Ramirez

INFSCI 0011: Introduction to Information Science (Advanced)

This course will introduce both information theory and the design and structure of information systems.  You will learn how computers and networks work at a fundamental level.  You will explore how social networks, collection of information (databases), and programming languages work.  The course will spend particular attention on security and privacy issues. The course will provide you with basic skills such as building web page, programming using simple JavaScript on web pages, design and use of simple databases, and manipulation of digital media.  The course meets the quantitative requirement for the College of Arts & Sciences, is designed for students with minimal prior technical coursework, and does not require previous programming experience.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Robert Perkoski

INFSCI 0014: Cybersecurity and the Law

Computers, the Internet, and mobile information technologies have become routine elements of our daily lives. The percentage of our social, professional, and political discourse mediated by information systems increases each year. Critical infrastructure likewise follows suit, with financial, healthcare, energy and other utilities leveraging the Internet to increase both capability and efficiency. In the physical world, we publish rules (laws) to govern our interactions with one another. These rules tell us what behaviors are permissible and what responsibilities we have to one another. In cyberspace, where these rules exist – and what they require – are less clear. This course explores questions surrounding how we "govern" cyberspace in the context of cybersecurity and privacy issues. We will examine a series of examples, both real-world and hypothetical, to investigate what policy "tools" are in-place, available, and should be available to address Internet security and privacy issues.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: David Thaw

INFSCI 1074: Computer Security

This course covers the fundamental concepts in Computer security and privacy. The course is intended to expose the various security threats and vulnerabilities in computer systems and provide an understanding of the various defense and protection mechanisms. Primarily, the course will focus on models and mechanisms  related  to  insuring  confidentiality,   integrity  and  availability  related  to  computer  and information systems. We will cover the basic concepts of cryptography including symmetric and public key encryption schemes. We then focus on program security issues such as buffer overflow attacks and discuss various control mechanisms to handle malicious code. The second half of the course will cover the topics of Database Security and general security issues in Operating Systems. Towards the end, we discuss various security and privacy issues in the context of emerging cloud computing systems.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of Java, data structures, database systems, networks, algebra, and trigonometry,
Faculty Liaison: Balaji Palanisamy

Language and Literature

FR 0003: Intermediate College French 1

This course is an intermediate-level college French course designed to give students productive and interpretive proficiency in the language. Emphasis is on contextualized development of all hour skills: speaking, writing, listening, and reading.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: At least two years of high school French
Faculty Liaison: Brett Wells

FR 0004: Intermediate College French 2

This course is a continuation of French 0003. Students continue to develop their integrated abilities in the language. Focus is on communicative competency.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: French 0003
Faculty Liaison: Brett Wells

GER 0003: Intermediate German 1

This is the first course in intermediate language training. The course is designed to continue to enhance students’ German language proficiency. It integrates all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and provides practice in these skills.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: At least two years of high school German
Faculty Liaison: Viktoria Harms

GER 0004: Intermediate German 2

This course is intended to follow Intermediate German 1 (German 0003) and is the final course in the second year college language sequence. The course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses at the university level where the focus will be on reading, writing, and speaking as well as business German and the interpretation of literary texts. This course integrates all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and provides practice in these skills.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: German 0003
Faculty Liaison: Viktoria Harms

LATIN 0210: Latin: Intermediate Prose

GALLIA EST OMNIS DIVISA IN PARTES TRES… With these memorable words Gaius Julius Caesar begins his Commentarii de Bello Gallico, a dramatic, no-frills narrative of his military campaigns that resulted in the conquest of Gaul and its annexation as a province under the control of the Senate and People of Rome. Students will read selections from the Commentarii as an introduction to continuous Latin prose and will pay close attention to the art of Caesar’s clear and deceptively simple style. They will also read an English translation of the whole work, The Gallic War, for in-class discussion.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Two years of high school Latin
Faculty Liaison: Mark Possanza

LATIN 0220: Latin: Intermediate Verse

This course is an introduction to Latin poetry. Students will read selections from Books I, II, and IV of Virgil's epic, The Aeneid, a poem that tells the amazing story of a band of Trojan refugees and their leader, Aeneas, who are searching for a new homeland. In the readings, close attention is paid to diction, style, meter, narrative technique, and the conventions of the ancient epic. Students also will read the whole poem in English for in-class discussion.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Two years of high school Latin
Faculty Liaison: Mark Possanza

SPAN 0003: Intermediate College Spanish 1

This course is Intermediate College Spanish 1. High School students will take this course instead of their standard fourth-year Spanish course. This course builds on and expands the language skills acquired in the first two semesters of Spanish or Spanish 15. It is designed to develop communicative proficiency. It combines content-based language instruction with an interactive task-based approach and focuses in all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Dolores Lima

SPAN 0004: Intermediate College Spanish 2

This course is Intermediate College Spanish 2. High School students will take this course instead of their standard fifth-year Spanish course. It is designed to develop communicative proficiency. This course builds and expands the language skills acquired in the first three semesters of Spanish. It combines content-based language instruction with an interactive task-based approach and focuses in all relevant language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Culture is integrated in all aspects of the program.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Dolores Lima

Mathematics or Statistics

MATH 0120: Business Calculus

This course provides an introduction to calculus for students interested in managerial, social, or biological science. Topics include functions, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation, integration, exponential and logarithmic functions, and an introduction to multivariable calculus. Many College in High School instructors also include the calculus of trigonometric functions.

Implementation Options »

Grade Sheet »

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: High school algebra and current facility with algebraic manipulations are essential. A score of 61 or higher on the ALEKS placement examination.
Faculty Liaison: Evgeni Trofimov

MATH 0220: Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1

This course is the standard first course in a basic calculus sequence required for all mathematics, science, engineering, and statistics students. Topics covered in this course include functions and graphs, limits, derivatives, trigonometric functions, application of the derivative, integral, applications of the integral, and exponential and logarithmic functions. As time allows, the College in High School course may include in its syllabus the differentiation of the logarithmic and exponential functions, which is the first topic in Calculus II at Pitt.

Implementation Options »

Grade Sheet »

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Skill in algebraic manipulation is essential. Trigonometry and two years of high school algebra or precalculus are required. A score of 76 or higher on the ALEKS placement examination.
Faculty Liaison: Angela Athanas

MATH 0230: Analytic Geometry and Calculus 2

This course is the standard second course in a basic calculus sequence required for all mathematics, science, engineering, and statistics students.

Implementation Options »

Grade sheet »

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Successful completion (a grade of C or higher) of Math 0220 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1
Faculty Liaison: Jeffrey Wheeler
Course Outline »

MATH 0280: Introduction to Matrices and Linear Algebra

The principal topics of the course include vectors, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and selected applications.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Thomas Everest

STAT 0200: Basic Applied Statistics

This course teaches methods and terminologies of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students who complete this course will be able to conduct their own analyses of standard one-sample or two-sample data sets, follow statistical reasoning, and read statistical reports with understanding. Introductory topics in linear regression, analysis of variance, and contingency table analysis also will be covered.

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra are recommended
Faculty Liaison: Nancy Pfenning
Associate Faculty Liaison:

Natural Sciences

CHEM 0110: General Chemistry 1

This is the first half of a two-term introduction to general chemistry. Topics include atomic theory, molarity, gases and kinetic theory, thermochemistry, electronic structure and the periodic table, relationships between phases, ionic solutions and acid/base theories, redox reactions, carbon chemistry, rates of reactions, chemical equilibria, and thermodynamics. This course requires laboratory sessions and exams on the University of Pittsburgh campus.

Implementation Options »

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: High school chemistry
Faculty Liaison: Susan Maleckar

PHYS 0174: Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 1

This is the first term of a two-term introductory lecture-demonstration sequence in physics for science and engineering students. Calculus is used as needed and should be taken at least concurrently. Subjects covered include kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, angular momentum, gravitation, oscillations, mechanical waves, and kinetic theory.

Implementation Options »

Number of Credits: 4
Prerequisites: Math 0220 either before or concurrently with Physics 0174
Faculty Liaison: Al Janis

PSY 0010: Introduction to Psychology

The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of the diverse field of psychology, and an appreciation of the way that behavior and mental processes can be studied scientifically.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Faculty Liaison: Natasha Tokowicz

School of Social Work

SOCWRK 1000: Introduction to Social Work

This course provides an overview of professional social work. It examines the historical development of the profession of social work; introduces the profession’s values, ethics, and practice principles; examines the major interventive methods of social work practice; identifies the generalist base of social work practice; and explores the social service delivery networks which comprise the social welfare system in urban environments.  Social work’s historic commitment to social justice and to the elimination of poverty is integrated throughout the course.  Ecological social systems framework is also introduced and integrated as diversity and global impacts are introduced.  The course format includes lecture presentations, discussion, guest presentations, reading assignments, examinations, student volunteer service, and visits to social agencies.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Keith Caldwell

Social Sciences

HIST 0101: Western Civilization II

This is an introductory-level course in Western European History that handles topics from the Scientific Revolution to the Cold War. It provides a framework for those who will continue in the study of History, and it provides an overview for those seeking to fulfill “General Education” requirements. There are no prerequisites. This course will introduce major questions of historical process and it will emphasize chronological, comparative, and contextual reasoning and the construction of original arguments grounded in historical evidence.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Leslie Hammond

HIST 0301: Imperial Russia: From the Emancipation to Revolution

The overall goal of this course is to give students a broad overview, and deep understanding, of the Russian Empire at the peak of its power in the 19th century and its collapse in the world-shaking Russian Revolution of 1917. The course is designed around broad historical questions that will encourage students to develop their own questions and ideas. To understand both the rise and fall of the Imperial Russia, we will explore the social, political, religious and ideological building blocks of Russian society and why they could not weather the storm of modernity. Student will learn how to work with both primary and secondary sources to develop their own ideas about how this period in Russian history unfolded the way that it did. Given that the 19th century was a golden age of Russian literature students will also be required to analyze Russian fiction as a lens into Russian society.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: No prerequisite required
Faculty Liaison: R. Scott Smith

HIST 0600: US History from Settlement through the Civil War

This covers U.S. History from the explorations of the 15th Century through the Civil War. It will provide an overview for those seeking to fulfill “General Education” requirements. Students will cover topics such as settlement, the process of colonization, the development, entrenchment, and experience of slavery, the road to revolution, the birth of a new nation, the role of government, expansion, political and economic change, the growth of institutions, reform movements, the rise of sectional conflict, and war. Students will interpret primary and secondary sources, learn to read and construct historiographical arguments, and hone analytical and evidenced based writing skills.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Liann Tsoukas

HIST 0601: US History from Reconstruction to the Present

This introductory level course covers central developments in U.S. History from Reconstruction to the present. It will provide an overview for those seeking to fulfill “General Education” requirements. This period in U.S. History is characterized by dramatic and sweeping political, economic, social, and cultural change, as well as expanding global engagement. Students will interpret primary and secondary sources, learn to read and construct historiographical arguments, and hone analytical and evidenced based writing skills.

Number of Credits: 3
Faculty Liaison: Liann Tsoukas

PS 0200: American Politics

This course is, quite generally, designed to provide students with a basic working knowledge of the basic goals of the Constitutional Framers, giving students an understanding of the purposes of the American political system, the essential structures (or institutions) within the American political system, the behavior (broadly defined) of the actors within the American political system, the purpose and performance of the linkage institutions in the United States (possibly including political parties, elections, and interest groups), and the types of policies that are often produced by a system with the characteristics of those found in the United States.

Number of Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Basic algebra
Faculty Liaison: Kristin Kanthak